Listening Devices and Bug Frequency Chart

How-to-find-them

This Post will tell you all you need to know about different types of

Listening Devices” and the ways to go about finding them.

With the use of a few tools you will be able to locate the “Bug” and
even listen to what they are listening to.

The Different types of “Bugs”

The Simplest Of the Bugs

This is the acoustic bug, which uses a stethoscope, rubber tube or glass for direct communication with the ear.

As such, this can be performed on a leaky window, structural defect, ventilation structures and more.

Wall Listening Audio Spy Device

Direct Interminable Tapping into a Phone Or Phone Line

The hard-wire bug is powered by the phone itself and only transmits during calls, thus the difficulty in its detection.

Alternative to directly on the phone, it can be placed at the meeting point of the phone line and junction box.

Phone-Bug

The Radio Frequency Bug

Inexpensive, easily detected but difficult to trace its planter, this bug can be placed on any items.
It sends signals wirelessly through the air and someone nearby intercepts and listens to them.

RF-Bug

Infrared/Optical Listening Devices

These function by projection of a laser, or infrared beam, through an opening into the location being bugged.

This beam picks up the audio and transfers it to the sender, who can be even several miles away.

They are thus expensive and easily detectable, but sounds transmitted are very accurate.

bionic-ear

The Ultrasonic Bug

Placed in a room like a radio frequency bug, it however transmits a different type of signal.

Sound undergoes conversion into an audio signal above human hearing range,

intercepted from a close range and reverted to the original audio signal.

As such, it is both expensive and difficult to detect.

Wall_Listening_system

Conducting a Sweep

One of the errors people bugging make is preferring clustering around certain frequencies.

However, the RF spectrum has to be checked in entirety, which is a long process.

Common Transmission Paths

There are many different types of listening devices whether they are available to the public or the police here is a basic guide

on different types of bugs and tips and ways to go about finding them.

And remember these days you cannot trust anyone!

The bug may utilize telephone, AC power circuits, HVAC or cable TV wiring.

Alternatively, spread spectrum technology or even digital modulation may be used.

A search grid, less than 10 by 10 feet is used, with whichever form of variation in the floor of noise being investigated.

Electronic as well as visual techniques are also used in inspection.

Frequencies which are generally above 1GHz, an amplified dual ridged wave-guide or any standard gain low as well as horn noise amplifier can be used for signal collection.

After detection of any form electromagnetic anomaly, the signal type is identified.

Bug-reciever
Be Thorough

Bugs & wamp; listening devices are usually installed in threes.

That is the

1. The fool’s,

2. The novice’s

3. and the real bug.

The first two are easier to locate and are to throw you off, while the third, the actual bug, is most difficult to find.

All electrical outlets, light fixtures, distribution boxes, circuit breakers, transformers and electric meters must thus undergo checking for anomalies.

The surveillance may be far from the recorder or transmitter, hence ensure to check all possible transmission paths.
A well-performed sweep detects bugs from a relatively long distance.

gsmlisteningdevice

Common Trends

When targeting corporate entities, bugs usually used have a transmission frequency of

20MHz – 3GHz

while one more willing to spend can obtain one that operates between

3GHz – 21GHz and above.

Hence, radio frequency as well as signal analysis during inspections needs to cover at least

9 kHz to 21 GHz, with 30 Hz to one that is above a 110 GHz being ideal.

Bellow is a reference to all the frequencies you should be aware of when searching for a bug it will help you identify any threats.

High Threat Frequency Bands

kHz

Type

Device

50 – 750 Carrier Current Bugs Power, Phone, HVAC lines
MHz
25 – 80 Ultra low power devices (micro watt devices)
65 – 130 Micro power Part 15 devices (FM broadcast band)
130 – 150 Body Wires and Wireless Microphones – Band I
150 – 174 Body Wires and Wireless Microphones – Band II
174 – 225 Body Wires and Wireless Microphones – Band III
295 – 310 Spread Spectrum and Micro powered Bugs micro watt devices
330 – 440 Audio/Video Bugs(398.605, 300.455, and 399.030 MHz are popular)
430 – 550 Audio/Video Bugs (433.920 and 418 MHz is popular)
800 – 990 Audio/Video Bugs (902-985 MHz ISM band is popular)
GHz
1.10 – 1.95 Video and Audio (980 MHz to 1.45 GHz is very popular)
2.00 – 2.75 Video and Audio (2.4 to 2.45 GHz is extremely popular)
5.60 – 7.50 Video and Audio (5.8 to 6.2 GHz is becoming very popular)
8.10 – 13.00 Video and Audio (Popular)
nm
850 – 950 Infrared Transmitters
DC – 3 kHz Typical Audio Band
3 – 500 kHz Skin Effect (Non Radiating)
500 kHz – 3MHz Non Radiating, Conducted RF
3 – 300 MHz Conducted RF, Free Space Radiating
300 MHz – 3 GHz Free Space Radiating RF, Slightly Directional
3 – 22 GHz Free Space, Low Attenuation., Highly Directional
22 – 60GHz Water Vapor Absorption Band
60 GHz – 3 Thz Limited Usage For Covert Surveillance

Commonly Used Professional and Enforcement Bugging Frequencies

Measurement Type Device
300 Hz – 15 kHz Audio Detection Base Band Audio
10 – 150 kHz Ultrasonic Ultrasonic Audio
20 – 350 kHz VLF-Free Space Video Cameras & Tape recorders
0.3 kHz – 50 MHz Carrier Current 99% Voice (CC and PLA)
10 – 450 MHz Carrier Current 99% Voice (AC Mains Antenna)
3 kHz – 50 MHz Free Space-HF 99% Voice
30 – 300 MHz Free Space-VHF 10% Video/80% Voice/10% Data
300 – 900 MHz Free Space-UHF 25% Video/60% Voice/15% Data
900 MHz – 3 GHz Free Space-MW1 50% Video/40% Voice/10% Data
3 – 18 GHz Free Space-MW2 Mostly Video and Data
18.0 – 26.5 GHz Free Space-MW3 Mostly Video and Data
26.5 – 40.0 GHz Free Space-MW4 Optional, based on threat
150 – 450 nm UV/Infrared Modulated UV Light Bugs
350 – 700 nm Modulated Visible Light Bugs (450 to 675nm very common)
700 – 1100 nm Very Common Audio Transmitters/Lasers (880 to 950nm)
800 – 1510 nm Audio Transmitters/Laser Microphones (rare)
750 – 900 nm Night Vision Illuminators
850 – 1750 nm IR Bugs and IR Illuminators
450 nm Modulated Tungsten bugs
490 nm Modulated Sodium bugs
575 nm Modulated Fluorescent bugs

Tactical Bugs

Range Type Device
225 – 400 MHz “Throw away” bugs (10uw-300mw Beer can bugs)
290 – 330 MHz Micro-powered Bugs (5uw-10mw Cigarette Butt Bugs)
180 – 430 MHz Spread Spectrum Wafer Bugs (1.5mm thick * 10mm * 2.9mm)
30 – 500 MHz Tactical Repeaters (75mw-300mw)
285 – 400 MHz Tactical Repeaters (50mw-10watts)
100 – 152 MHz VHF Tactical Repeaters (300mw-25watts)
135 – 174 MHz VHF Tactical Repeaters (300mw-25watts)

Frequencies Used By The Average Joe

Frequency Type Device
44.500 – 51.000 MHz Baby and Room monitors (49.83, 49.845, 49.875, etc)
72.100 – 75.400 MHz Hearing Assistance Systems
54.000 – 150.000 MHz Kit Bugs
78.000 – 115.000 MHz Cheap out-of-band FM Bugs
112.000 – 142.000 MHz Cheap out-of-band FM Bugs
140.000 – 160.000 MHz Cheap out-of-band FM Bugs
60.000 – 320.000 MHz Low Cost kit bugs
398.000 – 406.000 MHz DECO Bugs (398.600/605, 399.450/455, 399.025/030, 406 MHz
25.000 – 450.000 MHz European/English Kit Bugs
150.000 – 216.000 MHz Typical VHF “Body Wire” & Pro-Grade Bugs
109.000 – 140.000 MHz Digital VHF Pro-Grade Bugs
138.000 – 174.000 MHz Typical “Spy Shop” & LE Cheap VHF Bugs (155-172 Popular)
140.000 – 150.000 Mhz Popular Xandi Flea power kits (143/144 MHz)
150.000 – 170.000 MHz Popular Japanese Flea power kits (under 5mw)
150.000 – 220.000 MHz Commercial Wireless Microphones
169.000 – 172.000 MHz 47 CFR 90.265 Authorization *** VERY Popular ***
174.000 – 216.000 MHz 47 CFR 2.106 (NG115) Authorization
395.000 – 410.000 MHz German UHF Bugs (PK Electronics)
365.000 – 455.000 MHz English UHF Bugs (Lorraine/Ruby Electronics)
219.000 – 530.000 MHz English UHF Wireless Microphones (300-500 popular)
470.000 – 608.000 MHz Commercial Wireless Microphones
730.000 – 806.000 MHz Commercial Wireless Microphones
310.000 – 980.000 MHz Sony Bugs (.1mw – 3mw, Spread Spectrum)
470.000 – 489.000 MHz Sony Bugs (2.5mw – 20mw, WFM, Ultra low power)
770.000 – 810.000 MHz Sony Bugs (2.5mw – 20mw, WFM, Ultra low power)
902.000 – 928.000 MHz Sony Bugs (2.5mw – 20mw, WFM, Ultra low power)
947.000 – 954.000 MHz Sony Bugs (2.5mw – 20mw, WFM, Ultra low power)
889.000 – 960.000 MHz Modified Cordless Phones (S/S & Hoppers)
380.000 – 480.000 MHz Video Bugs – UHF TV Channels
430.000 – 820.000 MHz Popular US Video/Audio Bugging Systems
890.000 – 960.000 MHz Video Bugs – US (902-928 Hot)
905.000 – 928.000 MHz Video/Audio Consumer Products (i.e. Recoton)
1.100 – 1.400 GHz Video Bugs – *Very Hot in US/England/France/etc*
1.700 – 1.930 GHz Video Bugs – US
2.400 – 2.500 GHz Video Bugs – US *** VERY Popular ***
3.500 – 4.500 GHz Video Bugs – *Very Hot in England/France/etc*
5.725 – 5.850 GHz Video Bugs – US *** VERY Popular ***
6.200 – 7.500 GHz Video Bugs – US *** VERY Popular ***
8.00 – 12.50 GHz X-band Audio/Video Bugs
20.00 – 26.00 GHz K-band Audio/Video Bugs (Gaining Popularity)
70.00 – 110.00 GHz M-band Audio/Video Bugs (Gaining Popularity)

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